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Power Shearing

“Doing It Right”


By Nathan Griffith


Linda Law of Yoder, Colorado sent sheep! some excellent photos of the “right” way to shear, as demonstrated by professional shearer Tim Miller of McCook, Nebraska.

Ms. Law and Tony Stewart raise cattle, plus about 80 head of sheep. They have an OPP-free flock bred for lambing three times a year.

Mr. Miller is a rancher, but also shears thousands of sheep in Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado. Linda said, “It was amazing to watch how quickly and efficiently each sheep was relieved of its heavy fleece,” and added that “Not many young people these days earn a living doing this, but Tim Miller has managed it.”

In addition to cattle and sheep, Linda and Tony also have one of America’s top Border collie operations, offering working stock dog training, lessons and occasional sales. Tony won the demanding All-Around Stock Dog Championship in 2002. They can be reached at:

LT Border Collies

Ramah Highway

Yoder Colorado 80864

(719) 478-2840
www.LTBorderCollies.com

Shearer Tim Miller can be reached at:

Timothy Miller

808 Spruce Rd.

McCook, Nebraska 69001

(970) 260 4778


1) Tony Stewart of Yoder, Colorado-waiting to push his next sheep out to be shorn. Sheep are best penned overnight before shearing so they can 'empty out' and sit more comfortably without defecating and fouling the board.
1) Tony Stewart of Yoder, Colorado-waiting to push his next sheep out to be shorn. Sheep are best penned overnight before shearing so they can ‘empty out’ and sit more comfortably without defecating and fouling the board.
  
2) Tim Miller sets the sheep on its rump-on one thigh, not uncomfortably on its tailbone. With the sheep sitting up, it's time to grab the handpiece.
2) Tim Miller sets the sheep on its rump-on one thigh, not uncomfortably on its tailbone. With the sheep sitting up, it’s time to grab the handpiece.
3) The belly wool is taken off first.
3) The belly wool is taken off first.
  
4) The left hand pulls the udder up out of the way while shearing the sheep's crotch.
4) The left hand pulls the udder up out of the way while shearing the sheep’s crotch.
5) Sheep is tilted facing shearer's right-so one front leg goes between shearer's legs-in order to clip the sheep's left hind leg.
5) Sheep is tilted facing shearer’s right-so one front leg goes between shearer’s legs-in order to clip the sheep’s left hind leg.
  
6) Sheep-still held by Tim's legs-gets its butt clipped, over and past its anus.
6) Sheep-still held by Tim’s legs-gets its butt clipped, over and past its anus.
7) The rump and tail shorn, Tim straightens the sheep to start the neck.
7) The rump and tail shorn, Tim straightens the sheep to start the neck.
  
8) Clipping the sheep's neck.
8) Clipping the sheep’s neck.
9) Taking the 'long blows' up the back.
9) Taking the ‘long blows’ up the back.
  
10) Shearing the 'last side' to the paunch area.
10) Shearing the ‘last side’ to the paunch area.
11) Completing the hind leg on the 'last side.'
11) Completing the hind leg on the ‘last side.’
  
12) Ewe bleats encouragement to its confused lamb.
12) Ewe bleats encouragement to its confused lamb.





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